Member Associations of the Freie Wohlfahrtspflege

 


Arbeiterwohlfahrt (AWO)
1919 was the year of AWO's foundation. As a worker's welfare organization the Arbeiterwohlfahrt stands in the tradition of the social democratic labour movement. After developing rapidly, in 1933 it was disbanded by the National Socialists, who declared AWO illegal and expropriated its property. After the Second World War the authorities in East Germany (and in East-Berlin after 1961) refused to re-register the organization and so, with the refounding of the eastern German section in 1990, AWO finally came together again after a break of 57 years. With the reunion of AWO's sections in east and west there are now 600,000 members, 135,000 full-time men and women and thousands of voluntary workers performing socially committed work in services and facilities right across the country.


www.awo.de


Deutscher Caritasverband (DCV)
The Deutsche Caritasverband, which has its headquarters in Freiburg (in Breisgau), was founded in 1897 by Lorenz Werthmann as the welfare organization of the Catholic Church in Germany. It comprises 27 diocesan Caritas organizations, with numerous deanery, regional, district and local Caritas organizations, 262 charitable communities run by religious orders and 19 professional associations. More than 380,000 full-time staff and many voluntary helpers from the parishes perform the daily work of caring for, attending to, educating and advising well over a million people in Caritas facilities and institutions. The German Caritas Federation also provides help abroad for people in need or when disasters occur anywhere in the world. It is also assisting in building up social structures in Eastern Europe and the countries of the Third World. In addition to a central further training academy, the Caritas also runs over 700 training centres for social services professions.


www.caritas.de


Der Paritätische Gesamtverband
The PARITÄTISCHE is a non-denominational welfare organization made up of independent organizations, institutions and groups engaged in social work. It incorporates more than 9,300 member organizations with over two million people in the Federal Republic of Germany. It provides the complete range of services in the field of social work thanks to approx. 16,000 full-time and hundreds of thousands voluntary staff. The PARITÄTISCHE supports and represents its member organizations in 16 Land associations with more than 280 district offices.


www.paritaet.org


Deutsches Rotes Kreuz (DRK)
The Deutsche Rote Kreuz is now made up of 19 Land associations with 529 district associations and nearly four million members and personnel. The Red Cross was created in 1863 in Geneva by a five-man committee of Swiss citizens, including Henry Dunant. The same year saw the founding of the first Red Cross community in a German region: the Württembergische Sanitätsverein in Stuttgart. The Deutsche Rote Kreuz was established in the Federal Republic of Germany in 1950, and with German unification in 1991 the German Red Cross was joined by the five DRK Land associations on the territory of the former GDR.


www.drk.de


Diakonisches Werk der Evangelischen Kirche in Deutschland (DW der EKD)
The member organizations of the Diakonisches Werk der Evangelischen Kirche in Deutschland include the 24 Land Churches of the protestant Church in Germany, nine Free Churches with their charitable institutions and around 90 professional associations in very different fields of work and specializations. These members represent around 26,000 independent social institutions of varying size and legal form, which employ over 400,000 full-time and part-time staff. There are also more than 5,000 charitable self-help groups and groups of non-professional carers. The charitable work is also supported by some 18,000 parishes of the Land Churches and Free Churches in which hundreds of thousands of volunteers are active.


www.diakonie.de


Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der Juden in Deutschland (ZWST)
The Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der deutschen Juden was established in 1917 as an umbrella organization for Jewish organizations and welfare institutions. The ZWST was disbanded by the National Socialists. In 1952 the association was re-formed as the Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der Juden in Deutschland to serve the Jewish communities and Land associations. The range of social work carried out by the ZWST includes, amongst other things, care and counselling in local Jewish communities, holidays for senior citizens, children and young people and further training for social service staff.


www.zwst.org